American Foulbrood reported in Eastern Middle TN

From State Apiary inspector Michael Studer
Urgent Message. Local Beekeeping Associations, please forward this e-mail to all of your members that may have Registered or unregistered apiaries in the following counties: Bledsoe, Cumberland, Meigs, Rhea or Roane. Several cases of American Foulbrood were discovered when a diligent beekeeper called reporting problems with a couple of colonies. Tests confirmed several colonies were positive for American Foulbrood. These colonies were in the early stages of infection. Those colonies have been destroyed. The preliminary list of registered apiaries in the listed counties is 177 locations. This list will be narrowed down and all registered beekeepers with valid e-mails located within 8 miles of the infected colonies will be notified by e-mail ASAP (Hopefully within 24 hours). We will be notifying all registered beekeepers within the affected area and inspecting all apiaries within the
 affected area in the next few weeks. Any beekeeper that thinks they may have AFB should send an e-mail to mike.studer@tn.gov ASAP. Anyone that knowingly has American Foulbrood and does not report it is subject to a $500.00 fine. Please be careful moving colonies within these counties get your local area inspectors to come out and inspect before you move anything.  Anyone moving colonies out of these counties or within these counties without a health certificate is subject to a $500.00 fine. Please everyone be diligent about hygiene when going from one apiary to the other. Designate a hive tool for each apiary or burn them between apiaries. If you know of anyone in these counties that is not registered please have them register their colonies ASAP.

Be Careful with your Queen Excluder

Almost every beginning beekeeper has a queen excluder that came with a kit – and almost everyone is anxious to deploy it so that they can get a super or two of nice pristine honey without any brood to worry about. To everything there is a season, and your first year with bees is not the time to use your excluder – at least not like that.

Every year I get a question or run across someone who is wondering why their bees won’t go through their queen excluder – to get to the super of bare foundation sitting on top. Well the short answer is that they probably never will.

Almost every beginning beekeeper has a queen excluder that came with a kit – and almost everyone is anxious to deploy it so that they can get a super or two of nice pristine honey without any brood to worry about.  To everything there is a season, and your first year with bees is not the time to use your excluder – at least not like that.

Every year I get a question or run across someone who is wondering why their bees won’t go through their queen excluder – to get to the super of bare foundation sitting on top.   Well the short answer is that they probably never will.   Bees don’t really like to go through a queen excluder anyway, but if there isn’t anything above it that they want (bare foundation) then they almost surely won’t – unless the hive is absolutely cram packed with bees, in which case they are more likely to swarm than to go through an excluder to get to foundation.

As a general rule don’t use a queen excluder until after you have enough comb drawn out to fill your brood boxes and at least 1 honey super.  Then you can put the excluder between the brood chamber and the honey supers – with drawn comb in them – and the bees are much more likely to co-operate.   Although even then they make the hive more likely to swarm.

If you do want to use them so that you don’t have brood in your honey supers you can wait until most of the honey flow is over to add the excluder – say around May 20 or so, after the poplar and locust bloom are about over. Then any brood above it will emerge and the comb will get back filled with honey. As long as you get the queen below it that is.

If you use a queen excluder during the honey flow it will be more work to keep your bees from swarming. But it will also make it so that you have fewer boxes to inspect for queen cells.

It seems that a lot of hobby bee keepers don’t use them anymore – but commercial honey producers mostly do – I think.  If you use an excluder it won’t really make your bees produce less honey – not so you would notice anyway – but they may store more of it below the excluder therefore you won’t have to feed them as much.

As long as they are not out of room below they will be very reluctant to go through an excluder – which is kind of alright, because they will get the brood boxes fully stocked with honey before they go up into the supers.   Which is actually a good thing about the old tried and true method of using deep brood and shallow honey supers with an excluder always between them – if there is any honey in the supers that is yours, all honey below the excluder stays with the hive. It made it an easy call for new bee keepers and also results in pretty white honey combs that don’t have brood cocoons in them – for what that’s worth.

Queen excluders are just a tool, and like any tool can be useful if used correctly, but can be counterproductive if misused.   Because of this many people call them honey excluders, but research indicates that is not really the case.

Queens For Pennies

April is prime time for making increase (at least it is when there isn’t a cold front blasting through) and while splitting hives is simple, effective and helps to manage swarming – you might also be interested in giving queen rearing a try. Now is the time to go for it if you are.

April is prime time for making increase (at least it is when there isn’t a cold front blasting through) and while splitting hives is simple, effective and helps to manage swarming – you might also be interested in giving queen rearing a try.  Now is the time to go for it if you are.

Randy Oliver has a new article on his website Queens For Pennies which details a simple and rather unique method for producing a bunch of queen cells from your very best one queen – very little special equipment required compared to other ways to go about it.  This article also has a very good illustration of how to graft with a Chinese tool.  You really should check it out.