May 2017 Meeting

Monthly Meeting: Our Regular monthly meeting will be Thursday May 4th – as usual the meeting will be at Collegeside Church beginning at 6:30PM – the doors will be open at 6:00PM, so come early to discuss how your bees are doing, and what’s happening next!

This month we will be discussing two highly-related topics… swarm catching / trapping, and cut-outs.  If you have any equipment that you’ve found useful, and you’d like to share – please don’t hesitate to bring it so others can see & learn from your experience.  We’ll also discuss the techniques we’ve tried and found success with (or failed with), and hopefully everyone can learn a little bit more.

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Making Lotion Bars

While our honeybees produce many different products for us, one of the most precious is wax.  If you have kept bees for very long, you have probably collected at least some of it.  There are many different possible uses for bees wax, but one very common use is making lotion bars.  Many people suffer from dry skin in the winter and need a moisturizer that is a little more durable and long-lasting than lotion.  Here is a recipe that I have found to be a good balance between hardness (not melting) in the heat of the summer, and softness (you’re not rubbing your skin with a rock) during the colder months.  You’ll need the following:

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Winter Feeding – BeeCakes

Keeping your bees alive and healthy during the winter is a very important and sometimes challenging task.  One very effective method of feeding is putting sugar directly on the top-bars of the top box of the hive.  When the cluster is in direct contact with sugar (even solid sugar), it is very difficult for them to starve.  Below I have outlined a recipe I have found to be very useful in keeping my bees healthy and happy during the winter.  In order to make Bee Cakes, you will need the following:

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Syrup Delivery: an overview of honey bee feeders

So let's say that you're now convinced that you do need to feed your honey bees. You go buy some sugar, mix it with some water, and you want to feed it to your bees. But how do you get it to them? That's actually a slightly more complex question than you might think. Let's take a look at some of your options (listed in no particular order) for delivering liquid syrup to your bees along with the pros and cons of each.

So let's say that you're now convinced that you do need to feed your honey bees. You go buy some sugar, mix it with some water, and you want to feed it to your bees. But how do you get it to them? That's actually a slightly more complex question than you might think. Let's take a look at some of your options (listed in no particular order) for delivering liquid syrup to your bees along with the pros and cons of each.