Beekeeping tasks this month – November

autumn-honey-bee-jason-politte

It’s November, the leaves are almost completely gone, and it’s getting cold… what should I be doing as a beekeeper this month?

The following list was published by Dr. John A. Skinner (Professor & Apiculture Specialist @ UT) in the Beekeeping in Tennessee publication from UT (PB 1745), and is available at the following URL:  https://utextension.tennessee.edu/publications/documents/PB1745.pdf

Seasonal Management: November

• Cut tall grass to reduce moisture against hives and reduce wood rot.

• Check all tops to be sure they are waterproof.

• Place a weight on the outer cover to prevent the wind from blowing the top off the hive.

• Feed all colonies that do not have at least 40 pounds of honey stored. (A deep-brood frame holds 6 to 7 pounds of honey; a medium frame holds 4 1?2 pounds; a shallow super frame holds 3 1?2 pounds.)

• Feed 2:1 syrup or prepare a candy board for feeding colonies without enough stored honey for overwinter. Colonies may not take syrup after the first hard frost and tend to not be able to convert syrup to stored honey. Alternatively to a candy board, sugar ‘goop’ may be used. To make sugar goop, a spacer can be placed above the top box. Lay a single layer of newspaper down. Trowl out a mixture of granulated sugar and water. The mixture is made with a very small amount of water so that the sugar granules stick together and do not run.

autumn-honey-bee-jason-politte

It’s November, the leaves are almost completely gone, and it’s getting cold… what should I be doing as a beekeeper this month?

The following list was published by Dr. John A. Skinner (Professor & Apiculture Specialist @ UT) in the Beekeeping in Tennessee publication from UT (PB 1745), and is available at the following URL:  https://utextension.tennessee.edu/publications/documents/PB1745.pdf

Seasonal Management: November

• Cut tall grass to reduce moisture against hives and reduce wood rot.

• Check all tops to be sure they are waterproof.

• Place a weight on the outer cover to prevent the wind from blowing the top off the hive.

• Feed all colonies that do not have at least 40 pounds of honey stored. (A deep-brood frame holds 6 to 7 pounds of honey; a medium frame holds 4 1?2 pounds; a shallow super frame holds 3 1?2 pounds.)

• Feed 2:1 syrup or prepare a candy board for feeding colonies without enough stored honey for overwinter. Colonies may not take syrup after the first hard frost and tend to not be able to convert syrup to stored honey. Alternatively to a candy board, sugar ‘goop’ may be used. To make sugar goop, a spacer can be placed above the top box. Lay a single layer of newspaper down. Trowl out a mixture of granulated sugar and water. The mixture is made with a very small amount of water so that the sugar granules stick together and do not run.

1 thought on “Beekeeping tasks this month – November”

  1. Appreciate the emails on what’s happening in Putnam Co. I very much would like to attend your meetings. Travel time is an issue. And I will be there…..eventually. And I appreciate the great photos of local bees. It would be great to also have a photo of the sugar “goop” that could show consistency. How will the new keeps know if they have it right? A picture is worth a thousand words. Keep up the great work.!!!! ????????

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